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Survey; Canadians willing to pay more for local food; Are you?  Actions...
Posted: by dreamer16 on Sun. 5 Aug., 2012 at 1:02:07 PM

Are you willing to pay more for local food products?  Why?  Or, why not?

I am.  I appreciate the freshness, plus, more importantly, I want to support the producers in this area.  I believe that this important, both to sustain current employment and to keep food production in this country.  Once we lose this, it's gone forever.


http://www.lfpress.com/life/eat/2012/08/05/20069366.html


Ontarians and British Columbians are willing to pay more for local wine, fruits, vegetables and meat products than any other province, a survey released on the weekend says.

It also found that Albertans are the most likely to buy local when they shop for beef and that Quebecers are the most likely to buy their local food from fruit and vegetable stands.

"BMO research suggests that Canadians are becoming increasingly loyal to the notion of buying local food, particularly fruits and vegetables, cheese, beef and poultry. Consumers appreciate the quality of food produced by local farm families and recognize the importance of supporting an agricultural sector that accounts for one in eight jobs in Canada," David Rinneard, a spokesman for BMO Bank of Montreal, said in a statement.

The study also revealed that Canadians are most likely to buy Canadian food products when grocery shopping for vegetables (91%), fruit (86%), poultry (84%), cheese (81%), and beef (78%).

Those surveyed cited the number one benefit for buying Canadian food is supporting Canadian producers. Freshness, the environment and safety were also recognized as top benefits.


"Why fit in when you were born to stand out?"  Dr. Seuss

 "Your beliefs don't make you a better person, your behaviour does."  (unknown)

"If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking."  George S. Patton

The poster formerly known as Writer Mom (stolen from Prince)  

dreamer16
edited Sun. 5 Aug., 2012 @ 1:03:27 PM by dreamer16
 
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If it can be found  Actions...
Posted: by ABmom99 on Sun. 5 Aug., 2012 at 3:37:55 PM
In reply to: dreamer16 "Survey; Canadians willing to pay more for local food; Are you?"
locally. Yes, I do eat local beef & pork.  I get some veggies in summer time through farmer's markets.  However... in our part of the country not much fruit grows here, and come winter time I buy fresh veggies that are of course imported - so unless we turn our clock back by 50+ years to have a much smaller selection of fresh food to keep it local, I'll have to buy food brought in from a distance.  Heck, even my grocery store is a 25 km trip away as we only have 2 small stores in our small town - however one of them is also a meat market/butcher so we get great beef locally without a drive.

ABmom99
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Oh yes!  Actions...
Posted: by TheCoho on Sun. 5 Aug., 2012 at 4:10:56 PM
In reply to: dreamer16 "Survey; Canadians willing to pay more for local food; Are you?"
Both freshness and the environment are my main reasons for buying locally and seasonally.

I would not say that "supporting Canadian producers" is always a reason because where I live, for example, on Vancouver Island it might be more environmentally friendly to purchase produce grown in Washington State as opposed to buying from producers in the Okanagan.

 

Coho salmon are prized for their excellent fighting abilities and acrobatics

TheCoho
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Yes for me!  Actions...
Posted: by Mary... on Sun. 5 Aug., 2012 at 6:33:04 PM
In reply to: dreamer16 "Survey; Canadians willing to pay more for local food; Are you?"
I just love buying local. Love supporting local farmers, the environmental advantages, and the taste is so much better!

Mary...
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I shop locally  Actions...
Posted: by newone on Sun. 5 Aug., 2012 at 7:40:18 PM
In reply to: dreamer16 "Survey; Canadians willing to pay more for local food; Are you?"
Yes, I will pay more for better quality, whether it's produce, coffee or cheese, fish or meat.  I'd rather cut back in other areas, but good, fresh food, usually local, is something I will pay for.  Coffee is harder, but I only buy fair trade coffee.  I also shop locally, supporting the stores nearby that are owned and run by locals.  It's not always more expensive to buy local; usually I can buy just the amount I need, rather than a package with more than I need, and I save on gas by not driving out to the big box stores.


newone
edited Sun. 5 Aug., 2012 @ 7:42:40 PM by newone
edited Sun. 5 Aug., 2012 @ 7:44:48 PM by newone
edited Sun. 5 Aug., 2012 @ 8:02:41 PM by newone
 
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Those are good points!  Actions...
Posted: by Mary... on Mon. 6 Aug., 2012 at 6:46:02 AM
In reply to: newone "I shop locally"

I too like buying smaller quantities to avoid wastage.

In fact, what I like most is buying at the Farmers Market and that payment goes directly to the farmer.

Mary...
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Most definitely  Actions...
Posted: by flowerpot on Sun. 5 Aug., 2012 at 9:23:00 PM
In reply to: dreamer16 "Survey; Canadians willing to pay more for local food; Are you?"
I'd be a hippocrite if I didn't (a farmer not supporting fellow farmers)  Even though it doesn't make sense that shipped in produce is cheaper than what is grown locally, I will always support the local economy, Alberta produce/meat and Canadian produce before buying imported food. 


                                        

flowerpot
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absolutely!  Actions...
Posted: by a.doll on Mon. 6 Aug., 2012 at 10:05:22 AM
In reply to: dreamer16 "Survey; Canadians willing to pay more for local food; Are you?"

I am totally committed to supporting my local farmers and buy food fresh and in season whenever possible.  I don't mind paying more.  Fresh locally produced (unprocessed) food is healthier for you, tastes far better and lasts longer in your fridge than food that has been shipped great distances.  I am also becoming more likely to seek out organically produced food than ever before.  I believe that if more of us were to buy organic the prices would eventually go down.

 

 
 

When you feel in your gut what you are and then dynamically pursue it – don’t back down and don’t give up – then you’re going to mystify a lot of folks. ― Bob Dylan

The poster formerly known as plexy (stolen from Jack Johnson)  and before that known as sexyplexy (nickname just for fun!)  ;)

 

 


 

 

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We very much enjoy local produce  Actions...
Posted: by Marsha on Mon. 6 Aug., 2012 at 4:17:34 PM
In reply to: dreamer16 "Survey; Canadians willing to pay more for local food; Are you?"
and locally raised meat (a dear friend who has beef cattle often sends us "gift packages").  I am fortunate to be in the Niagara Peninsula - great produce is coming in right now (the peaches are unbelievably good).  We shop the farmers' markets in my city and when we're out of town, like yesterday, we take advantage of the wonderful road-side stands for fruit and vegetables and even jams (though I prefer to get those at one vendor in my local farmers' market as I know their quality and preparation standards).  Obviously, in winter, choices are much, much more limited and there are fruits and vegetables we like all year round that simply are not locally grown (oranges, coffee, lemons....). We're lucky that we can afford to pay a bit more for locally grown/raised food products but I recognize that not everyone is that lucky.

Marsha
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Posted: by dreamer16 on Mon. 6 Aug., 2012 at 11:54:15 PM
In reply to: dreamer16 "Survey; Canadians willing to pay more for local food; Are you?"
As stated above, I believe that buying local is important for various reasons.  However, this is not always possible today, for many reasons, and this would be mainly a matter of choice.

When I was a child/teen, I lived on a small farm and we were fairly self-sufficient.  To say that we 'bought local' would have been an understatement at that time.  We produced our own beef, pork, chicken, turkeys, ducks, geese, eggs, milk (at one time, but not when I became school-aged), vegetables, corn, oats/wheat (depending on year), potatoes, apples, pears, strawberries, raspberries, and likely other things that are no longer coming to mind.  There was also a small, fully-functioning mill one-quarter of a mile away from our home (if we didn't produce our own wheat/oats), which is still functioning today and provides unbleached flour, whole wheat flour, bran, etc. to specialty cooking stores in the area.  We had local butchers and abbatoirs to process our meat.  In a nearby village (5 minute drive away), there was a creamery where the milk, butter, etc. was still being processed with local milk until recently.  They also made some basic cheddar cheese.  And so on.  My father often did business in the Niagara peninsula so he'd come home with bushel baskets of peaches in August each year.  

As a family we also processed some of this meat ourselves (the turkeys, capons, etc.), and we canned (peaches, pears, pickles, beets, applesauce, tomatoes, etc.) and froze (corn, peas, beans, etc.) and stored (potatoes, carrots, onions, apples, etc.) three seasons worth of food during the summer and fall months.  That's what we lived on throughout the year.  Our family bought minimal groceries.

As I grew up, I never tasted rice, pasta (no one knew how to make it), any spices other than salt and pepper (salt was produced in a town an hour away from here, and the pepper was bought at the grocery store), any cheese but cheddar, any fruit but those grown on our farm with the exception of bananas and oranges, which were bought at the grocery store, any vegetables that weren't grown on our farm, fish, and the list goes on and on.  We only ate what was available in our immediate environment.  It wasn't until I left home at the age of 20, that I discovered there was a whole different 'world' of food out there, and it did take me some time to adjust to eating these new tastes, spices, and types of sensations.  But, now I enjoy this, and wouldn't want to go back to eating this type of bland boring diet again in order to maintain a truly local diet.

Plus, I live in a small apartment and no longer have the space for an 18 cu. ft. (the size I had at my home when I did some of this this) or the older 22 cu. ft. (the size my family had) of freezer that this would take to sustain this type of lifestyle.  And I no longer have the type of cold space that one would need to store home canned goods either.

I say all power to anyone who wishes to do this, and I did do some of this for many years with my own family, but if one can't do this, then we all must do what we can and if we can't do more, then so be it.  All this would take is for everyone to do some small part of this for this to work adequately.  

  

 





"Why fit in when you were born to stand out?"  Dr. Seuss

 "Your beliefs don't make you a better person, your behaviour does."  (unknown)

"If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking."  George S. Patton

The poster formerly known as Writer Mom (stolen from Prince)  

dreamer16
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Sounds like...  Actions...
Posted: by flowerpot on Tue. 7 Aug., 2012 at 12:31:38 AM
In reply to: dreamer16 "..."
..the same life I grew up with.  A lot of hard work to reap those rewards.  I don't remember the meals being bland, but at the time, it was a real treat (novelty) to have some storebought food (remember SPAM?) - and I thought that was a treat??  Yuck now.
When my kids were little, I had a big garden and grew all our own veggies, bought our beef by the half from a neighbour, etc.  Then, I wasn't involved in the farm work so I had time to do all that.  No regrets, but no desire or time to do it now.   I'll pay the price at the local farmers market or Coop grocery store.
                                        

flowerpot
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To some degree  Actions...
Posted: by Caipirinha on Tue. 7 Aug., 2012 at 8:09:53 AM
In reply to: dreamer16 "Survey; Canadians willing to pay more for local food; Are you?"
when available I prefer fresh, local produce to that shipped from miles away.  Although I eat fruit and vegetables year-round, I choose to eat some things like strawberries, peaches and corn only when it is in season locally.

Something that I find most annoying in my local grocery store is that I can get a basket of Niagara peaches but since I am the only one that really eats them they usually go off before I can finish the basket.  If I want to buy a few individually, then I have to get U.S. fruit.  I also find it really annoying that I can't get cherries from Niagara and that the only ones available here are from the States.

 

Caipirinha
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The problem  Actions...
Posted: by Nanny G on Tue. 7 Aug., 2012 at 2:30:07 PM
In reply to: Caipirinha "To some degree"

is that we got used to having food not in season in Canada My province does not grow peaches and cherries and the corn is awfull..so we buy stuff that comes from outside. No problem with beef, pork, chicken but fruits and veggies yes. The problem is that trucking all this causes problems for the planet. Personnaly I am more confortable with food that comes in containers on the water, cheaper and nicer to the planet. Also container ships feed more people all over the world where there is a draught or flood or any disaster. Some can afford to pay $5.00 for a pound of green beans at the market but if you have 3 growing children, mother will be it  at safeway at $1.20 a pound.

Also organic is fine in rich countries  but it does not feed as many people, and in many countries it is a real concern. 

 

 

Nanny G
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Posted: by dreamer16 on Wed. 8 Aug., 2012 at 12:41:01 PM
In reply to: Caipirinha "To some degree"
I think this all comes down to price, and likely, selection too.  These grocery chains all pick up their wholesale goods at the Toronto food terminal and it's first come first serve there. Larger scale vendors or wholesalers bring in their produce from all over the world.  Those who get up early, and I do mean early, get the best goods.  From what I understand, it's the small retailers, such as markets and other small type of store owners who tend to get there first, since they must load and then drive their goods back to their own markets/stores for opening times that day.  They likely get the best, freshest, and most seasonal, local goods.  The representatives of these grocery chains get there at the beginning of a normal day, once the best of the best is gone.  Then, they select their produce, send their trucks in to pick it up, and from there it's sent to their own warehouses, where it sits for a bit longer until it's distributed to each individual grocery store.  But, they're also looking to competitive with other grocery stores, so try to keep their costs down.  And sometimes, to do that, it'd be cheaper to buy the import than to buy the local product, even if it was still available.  So, there's two possible scenarios.  :-)


"Why fit in when you were born to stand out?"  Dr. Seuss

 "Your beliefs don't make you a better person, your behaviour does."  (unknown)

"If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking."  George S. Patton

The poster formerly known as Writer Mom (stolen from Prince)  

dreamer16
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For some things, yes  Actions...
Posted: by BoJo on Wed. 8 Aug., 2012 at 1:43:48 PM
In reply to: dreamer16 "Survey; Canadians willing to pay more for local food; Are you?"

like local honey. I just bought some at our local 'farmers market' last week-end and it's soooo good! Also, I've heard that having local honey is better for allergies because it subjects your body to local pollen. I also buy local maple syrup because it's plentiful in my area. Garlic I get all I want because I work for local a local garlic grower. For fruits and veggies, I ususally buy at a store or at Costco. The only problem is that there is only one store that's within 15 minutes and it doesn't always have a good selection (it's small). The other store is 1/2 hour away so you have to consider the cost of gas.

BoJo
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Posted: by dreamer16 on Wed. 8 Aug., 2012 at 3:56:30 PM
In reply to: BoJo "For some things, yes"
That's good to know about local pollen; I didn't realize this and I have plenty of allergies.  I had been buying local honey, but I switched recently since I have a gd who's under two and was concerned about it being unpasturized (oops, spelling???).  Not that I was doing anything stupid such as giving her pure honey or anything like that when she was an infant, but sometimes we do use it in cooking or baking and don't think about this until after the fact so I decided to not take any chances with this.  I'll have to switch back fairly soon.  I ate this type of honey as a small child, right off the spoon or the honey comb (we produced it), and it didn't harm me.  ;-)

As for the rest, we all have to be sensible too.  It doesn't make sense to drive miles out of your way to get a basket or two of fruit or vegetables unless you're actually going there for pleasure or for something else.  Time matters too.



"Why fit in when you were born to stand out?"  Dr. Seuss

 "Your beliefs don't make you a better person, your behaviour does."  (unknown)

"If everyone is thinking alike, then somebody isn't thinking."  George S. Patton

The poster formerly known as Writer Mom (stolen from Prince)  

dreamer16
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allergies and bee pollen  Actions...
Posted: by frenchroast on Wed. 8 Aug., 2012 at 6:10:59 PM
In reply to: BoJo "For some things, yes"
I've been traveling a lot lately, and in the Spring got horrible allergies and heard then that allergies can be worse when traveling, because they're different from what you're used to.  They said in extreme cases, it's recommended you get some local pollen either to digest or inject, to become immune to local allergies.  I didn't think I was that bad, but thought it was interesting.
What do you use honey for?  I used to use some in baking, but now I use a tiny bit (because it's so sweet) of agave nectar if I want a liquid sweetener, or sucanat (sugar cane natural).  

frenchroast
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